Brand essentials

Please use the tabs below to learn more about the use of our visuals and logo.

The full name of our organisation is UK Research and Innovation.

We should use the name in full in written and printed communications, and when speaking to external audiences.

It is acceptable to shorten our name to UKRI (say each letter, U-K-R-I) in some circumstances:

  • In speech, when you are repeatedly using our name (but still try to use the full name as often as you feel comfortable doing). 
  • When speaking internally, to UKRI colleagues.
  • Where there is a strict character limit, for example on Twitter.
  • Where there is repetition of the phrase ‘research and innovation’, for example, in a speech where someone is saying “UK Research and Innovation wants the UK to be the best place for research and innovation”.

A logo is a visual representation of a brand, allowing people to recognise an organisation and its associated programmes, projects, places and people.

Over time, it should become shorthand for the organisation itself. To build this recognition, the logo must be used correctly and consistently.

The UK Research and Innovation logo is typographical; it has only words. This does not detract from its purpose nor from the way we treat and use it. 

The logo should always be reproduced from an original master logo file and must not be stretched, squashed, re-drawn or altered in any way. 

Master logo files are available in different formats, each appropriate for different uses:

  • For professionals (for example by an external designer or printer) use an eps file 
  • For office printing (sometimes referred to as desktop publishing) use a jpeg file
  • For digital and social media use a gif file
     
  • UK Research and Innovation logo pack (Zip, 9.2MB)

The UK Research and Innovation logo should be presented in full colour (charcoal) whenever possible. In exceptional cases, a black or reversed out version of the logo may be used.

For individual use, please use the partners logos, available below:

The logo must always have clear space around it, referred to as an exclusion zone. The minimum exclusion zone is the height of the ‘U’ as it appears in the logo.

Minimum size

The size of the logo also brings consistency to the UK Research and Innovation brand. The size of the logo should scale proportionately with the size of the document/screen. 

Our recommended logo sizes for different document sizes are:

  • DL 47mm wide
  • A5 47mm wide
  • A4 63mm wide

To ensure visibility, a minimum size has been set for the UK Research and Innovation logo:

  • 42 mm wide (in print)
  • 120 pixels wide (on screen)

There is no maximum size for the logo.

As with a logo, a defined typeface (or font) is part of the visual representation of a brand and helps build recognition. Like a logo, it must be used correctly and consistently.

The UK Research and Innovation typeface is Arial. Sometimes referred to as Arial MT, it is a clean, modern typeface well-suited to digital use. It comes as standard on most computers, both PC and Mac, making it readily available for all to use.

Guidelines on typeface sizes:

  • For body copy, use Arial 10.5 point
  • For headlines, use Arial 18 point bold
  • For larger formats, use Arial 27 point bold

If you need to darken or embolden your words, do not use Arial Black. Instead, use the ‘bold’ function to create Arial bold.

Helvetica can be used as an alternative typeface in situations where a wider range of styles is needed, for example in a professionally designed and printed brochure. Helvetica and Arial look very similar, but Helvetica offers professional designers more variety in terms of weights and styles.

Text at body copy size

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog

Text at headline size

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog

Text at larger formats size

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog

UK Research and Innovation has a colour palette for all purposes.

The primary (logo) colour is charcoal, complimented by a palette of secondary colours that can be used to highlight or accent content, or to enhance readability or attractiveness:

  • Charcoal (Pantone Cool Grey 10)
  • Purple (Pantone 258)
  • Blue (Pantone 7686)
  • Orange (Pantone 1665)
  • Teal (Pantone 327)

Primary

 
CHARCOAL
Pantone: Cool grey 10
RGB: 99, 102, 106
CMYK: 40, 30, 20, 66
Hex/HTML: 63666A

Secondary

 
PURPLE
Pantone: 258
RGB: 140, 71, 153
CMYK: 51, 79, 0, 0
Hex/HTML: 8C4799
 
BLUE
Pantone: 7686
RGB: 29, 79, 145
CMYK: 100, 73, 0,10
Hex/HTML: 1D4F91
 
ORANGE
Pantone: 1665
CMYK: 0, 79, 100, 0
RGB: 220, 68, 5
Hex/HTML: C34613
 
TEAL
Pantone: 327
RGB: 0, 134, 117
CMYK: 100, 2, 60, 14
Hex/HTML: 008275


Please note that the exact colours must be used, not approximations of them.

Colour use and proportions

There is an indicative guide of the proportions in which the UK Research and Innovation brand colours should be used. 

The primary colour, charcoal, including tints and shades, should be used most often to represent the brand. 

Following this are the navy and red, which should act as accent colours.

The secondary purple, blue, orange and teal can be used in equal proportions, with no preference to which is used first. These are accent colours and should not be used in large areas or floods of colour.

Colour palette in proportion

Introduction

This section illustrates the overall graphic style for communication material. The samples on display are meant to demonstrate how certain key design elements come together to create a consistent framework and overall look and feel, with a strong visual recognition.

The top header is our key element for correct branding application. It consists of four items:

  1. the logo, consistently placed on the top left and, with the exception of digital media where it uses a tighter fit, always in the dimension and exclusion ratio shown below
  2. a white or grey banner
  3. a colour band of a specific depth and colour order
  4. a white band of equal depth to the colour band to create a separation between the top header and the content.

The colour band can also be used throughout as a graphic element to further enhance the overall design, see examples below, but it should not be used vertically. Graphics and images should always be used in a squared or cut-out format, please refrain from introducing any other shape of framing (X = Equidistance from top, left side and colour band for headers).

Displays

A grey or white header can be used with the appropriate logo, which must always appear in the top left.

The colour band must always be horizontal and full width in the colour order illustrated. It should be 1/12 size of the top banner with the same white gap beneath. The colour band should not be used vertically.

There is no limit on the amount of images used but they must remain squared. Copy should be kept to a minimum.

Publications

Covers

A grey or white header can be used with the appropriate logo, which must always appear in the top left. The colour band must always be horizontal and full width in the colour order illustrated. It should be 1/12 size of the top banner with the same white gap beneath. The colour band should not be used vertically. There is no limit on the amount of images used but they must remain squared.

Text pages

The colour band is integral to the overall feel of the layout and can be used where appropriate. It should not be used vertically. Images should always remain squared. Colour boxes can be used to highlight text quotations in any of the corporate colours, either solid or tints.

The samples above are meant as a guide only and not as a fixed style.

Digital

Consistent use of the grey/white header is carried through design for digital, social media and the website. The digital applications shown here use a tighter fit for the spaces above and below the logo.

All social media banners use the grey header and white logo, with the colour band and white gap above a suitable image.

The logo should appear in the circular avatar as set by site guidelines.

Sample twitter tiles: