Funding opportunity

Funding opportunity: National Crime and Justice Laboratory academic lead

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Apply for a 12-month opportunity for a senior academic to provide leadership and strategic guidance to the National Crime and Justice Laboratory at the Home Office. You will advance efforts to derive new insights from Home Office data to guide criminal justice system policy and shape the direction of research, and explore how to make this data available to the academic community.

You must be based at a UK research organisation eligible for ESRC funding.

The full economic cost of your project can be up to £120,000. ESRC and Home Office will fund 80% of the full economic cost.

The funding period will commence on 1 April 2024 and last for 12 months.

Who can apply

Before applying for funding, check the Eligibility of your organisation.

UKRI has introduced new role types for funding opportunities being run on the new UKRI Funding Service.

For full details, visit Eligibility as an individual.

Who is eligible to apply

  • researchers based at UK research organisations eligible to receive UKRI funding can apply to this opportunity

Who is not eligible to apply

  • project co-leads will not be funded through this opportunity.

International applicants

Project leads from non-UK organisations are not eligible to apply for funding through this opportunity.

Project co-leads based in non-UK organisations are not eligible to apply for funding through this opportunity.

Read Project co-lead (international) policy guidance for details of eligible organisations and costs.

Business, third sector or government body project co-leads

Business, third sector or government body project co-leads are not eligible to apply for funding through this opportunity.

Resubmissions

We will not accept uninvited resubmissions of projects that have been submitted to UKRI.

Find out more about ESRC’s Resubmissions policy.

Equality, diversity and inclusion

We are committed to achieving equality of opportunity for all funding applicants. We encourage applications from a diverse range of researchers.

We support people to work in a way that suits their personal circumstances. This includes:

  • career breaks
  • support for people with caring responsibilities
  • flexible working
  • alternative working patterns

Find out more about equality, diversity and inclusion at UKRI.

Remit

Complete and submit the remit query form, if you are unsure whether your proposed research falls within the remit of ESRC.

What we're looking for

Background

The Home Office intends to establish the National Crime and Justice Laboratory (NCJL) to fulfil a 2019 manifesto commitment to “create a worldclass National Crime Laboratory ”. The NCJL aims to maximise the potential of the data currently held within policing and across government to support a data-driven approach to strategic policing, criminal justice system (CJS) and wider Home Office police development and evaluation. The NCJL will focus on addressing the most pressing strategic and policy questions related to crime prevention. To deliver this work the NCJL will facilitate secure access to sensitive crime and justice data for academic researchers and industry partners, harnessing their expertise to deliver valuable insights on use-cases which aim to deliver concrete benefits for law enforcement and criminal justice organisations. This is a ground-breaking and pioneering new programme that will have a real impact on evidence across policing and beyond and will allow for key lessons and experience to be cascaded nationally.

Why is the National Crime and Justice Lab being set-up?

Across policing and the Home Office there are critical questions that need answering in order to improve criminal justice outcomes. The information exists to answer many of these questions but is hidden within large datasets that need cleaning up, linking and analysing. To date, this has been constrained by a limited access to and understanding of the data, and the capacity of existing in-house resources.

The NCJL aims to open this data to academics to be able to utilise the untapped capacity and capabilities of academia and industry to provide a cost-effective and innovative response to pressing CJS priority areas and challenges. It will form part of the Home Office’s commitment to becoming an innovative, data-driven department by driving the use of innovative data science techniques to prevent and reduce crime. In doing so, it will contribute to government and Home Office ambitions including: The National Policing Mission as defined in Policing Vision 2025, the Beating Crime Plan, and the overall Home Office Vision and Data Strategy.

Overall, the NCJL aims to:

  • increase the utilisation and value of CJS data
  • improve data-driven policymaking, leading to improved CJS outcomes
  • increase the resource capacity to conduct rigorous and robust research
  • improve analytical capabilities (including methods, tools and expertise)
  • build partnerships across government, policing and academia

The NCJL academic lead

The NCJL is currently delivering an initial pilot stage and establishing the roadmap for expansion. This includes expansion in terms of acquiring new data and also for expanding access to existing data and the work it conducts with academia and industry. The NCJL Academic Lead will play a pivotal role in the development of the NCJL, working with the Home Office team to develop the roadmap for academic engagement and provide strategic thinking in this space.

The lead academic will:

  • work with the Home Office NCJL team to develop the strategy and roadmap for academic engagement with the lab, including how best to do this within existing budget and helping to create a case for further investment for expansion
  • play a pivotal role in leading a paid Academic Advisory Group of six to eight academics. Academics will be identified based on their knowledge and skills in data engineering, data linking, data security, data science and research. The academic lead will be jointly responsible for leading the group and ensuring the group’s advice and skills are deployed efficiently into the project as required. It will be critical for the post-holder to build and maintain strong relationships with this group
  • provide guidance and supervision to the government analysts and social researchers working on this project as well as any others who may work on the programme
  • work with the core lab team to determine research priorities and explore routes for commissioning these based on newly acquired data
  • champion the project and raise awareness through engagement with the research community
  • deliver quarterly research seminars with the external research community on a diverse range of relevant topics
  • help to overcome challenges throughout the project, particularly in relation to opening Home Office data and external data-shares with other government departments
  • work with stakeholders to identify pathways to data being made available through secure platforms to the UK academic research community, devising and taking forward activities to achieve this where possible

Applicants are not expected to propose a specific approach or project plan in their application as these will be devised with the Home Office and ESRC when the award commences. Instead, you should ensure that in your application you:

  • demonstrate examples of developing strategy and providing leadership in a context or subject area relevant to the NCJL programme. Examples could be from collaborating with policy stakeholders or practitioners, or leading a collaborative programme or initiative
  • demonstrate awareness of the current research and innovation landscape relevant to policing and criminal justice beyond your own particular research focus area
  • demonstrate awareness of the opportunities and challenges of working with and linking administrative data, understanding of data owner and controller responsibilities and frameworks for safe data access and use, and awareness of the risks associated with providing access to police and criminal justice data for research purposes
  • demonstrate awareness of the research evidence and analysis requirements in policing and the wider criminal justice system
  • demonstrate excellent communication and interpersonal skills
  • demonstrate examples of translating complex information and analysis into meaningful narrative for a non-academic audience
  • demonstrate examples of advising or influencing research users, practitioners and policymakers
  • demonstrate a keen understanding of the challenges and opportunities of co-production and collaboration with non-academics

This is a part time role (0.4 to 0.6 FTE). You can propose your preference within these parameters.

The post holder will be required to have security clearance to SC level and Non-Police Personnel Vetting level 3. The Home Office will facilitate and sponsor the application process, and final offering of the post will be subject to clearance being obtained.

You should normally have been resident in the UK for the last five years for SC clearance. A lack of UK residency in itself is not necessarily a bar to a security clearance and you should contact the vacancy holder or recruiting manager listed in the advert for further advice.

Find out more about the vetting charter.

Funding decisions will be communicated to ensure there is time for security clearance to be completed before the award period commences. This is reflected in the decision timeline described below.

Duration

The duration of this award is 12 months. Subject to funding and satisfactory performance ESRC and Home Office may wish to extend the award beyond this period, and in this instance would invite the grant holder to apply for extended funding before the initial award is concluded.

Projects must start by 1 April 2024 with the grant holder having completed security clearance prior to this date.

Funding available

The full economic cost of your project can be up to £120,000. This is a part time role of 0.4 to 0.6 FTE, and the full economic cost of this time commitment must not exceed this amount.

Within this full economic cost figure should be a travel and subsistence budget included to attend Home Office premises in central London no more than twice a month. Travel and subsistence costs of up to £15,000 can be included to achieve this.

ESRC and Home Office will fund 80% of the full economic cost.

What we will fund

  • time committed by the grant holder to the duties and activities described above
  • travel and subsistence up to £15,000

What we will not fund

  • data collection
  • primary research

Contributions of the host research organisation

Host research organisation contributions that complement and enhance proposed activity can be included.

Project Partners

You should not propose project partners. Home Office will connect the grant holder with all relevant partners.

Supporting skills and talent

We encourage you to follow the principles of the Concordat to Support the Career Development of Researchers and the Technician Commitment.

Intellectual property and publication

The grant holder, subject to completing security clearance, will work with sensitive data controlled by Home Office and its partners. The grant holder will only access this data for the purposes of the academic lead role and will only use it to progress the work of the NCJL programme. As such, the grant holder will not own the data, analysis of the data or intellectual property rights produced during the course of the award. The exception to this is methodological developments made by the academic lead that can be described and used without Home Office data, which the grant holder would retain.

All outputs from the award will be subject to ownership of the Crown and may only be published subject to Ministerial approval and police approval where sensitive police data has been used.

Please consult the additional Information section for more information.

Data requirements

ESRC recognises the importance of data quality and provenance. Data generated by ESRC-funded research must be well managed by the grant holder to enable their data to be exploited to the maximum potential for further research. See our research data policy for details and further information on data requirements. The requirements of the research data policy are a condition of ESRC research funding.

Where relevant, details on data management and sharing should be provided in the ‘Data management’ section. See the importance of managing and sharing data and content for inclusion in a data management plan on the UK Data Service (UKDS) website for further guidance. We expect applicants to provide a summary of the points provided. The UKDS (email: datasharing@ukdataservice.ac.uk) will be pleased to advise applicants on the availability of data within the academic community and provide advice on data deposit requirements.

Impact, innovation and interdisciplinarity

We expect applicants to consider the potential scientific, societal and economic impacts of their research. Outputs, dissemination and impact are a key part of the criteria for most peer review and assessment processes. We also encourage applications that demonstrate innovation and interdisciplinarity (research combining approaches from more than one discipline).

Knowledge exchange and collaboration

We are committed to knowledge exchange and encouraging collaboration between
researchers and the private, public and civil society sectors. Collaborative working benefits both the researchers and the individuals and organisations involved. Through collaboration, partners learn about each other’s expertise, share knowledge and gain an appreciation of different professional cultures. Collaborative activity can therefore lead to a better understanding of the ways that academic research can add value and offer insights to key issues of concern for policy and practice.

Knowledge exchange should not be treated as an ‘add-on’ at the end of a project but considered before the start and built into a project.

Equitable partnership principles

When undertaking research and innovation activities outside the UK, you must recognise and address the possible impact of contextual, societal and cultural differences on the ethical conduct of those activities.

Researchers should also follow the principles of equitable partnerships to address inherent power imbalances when working with partners in resource-poor settings.

Applying the principles will encourage equitable access, especially in low and middle-income countries (LMICs), while maintaining incentives for innovation. You should consider the principles from the start of the research and development cycle.

Read UKRI’s guidance on research in a global setting.

Trusted research

If your application includes international applicants, project partners or collaborators, visit Trusted research for more information on protection of those working in our thriving and collaborative international research and innovation sector.

Research ethics

ESRC requires that the research we support is designed and conducted in such a way that it meets ethical principles and is subject to proper professional and institutional oversight in terms of research governance. We have agreed a Framework for Research Ethics that all submitted proposals must comply with. Read further details about the Framework for Research Ethics and guidance on compliance.

The grant holder should engage with their home institution on any ethical concerns that arise from the proposed programme, including obtaining ethical approval where necessary. Should any ethical concerns arise over the course of the award these should be reported in line with their institutional policies, UKRI grant terms and conditions, and civil service principles and host institutions Data Ethics processes.

How to apply

We are running this funding opportunity on the new UKRI Funding Service. You cannot apply on the Joint Electronic Submissions (Je-S) system.

The project lead is responsible for completing the application process on the Funding Service, but we expect all team members and project partners to contribute to the application.

Only the lead research organisation can submit an application to UKRI.

To apply:

Select ‘Start application’ near the beginning of this Funding finder page.

  1. Confirm you are the project lead.
  2. Sign in or create a Funding Service account. To create an account, select your organisation, verify your email address, and set a password. If your organisation is not listed, email support@funding-service.ukri.org
  3. Answer questions directly in the text boxes. You can save your answers and come back to complete them or work offline and return to copy and paste your answers. If we need you to upload a document, follow the upload instructions in the Funding Service. All questions and assessment criteria are listed in the ‘How to apply’ section on this Funding finder page.
  4. Allow enough time to check your application in ‘read-only’ view before sending to your research office.
  5. Send the completed application to your research office for checking. They will return it to you if it needs editing.
  6. Your research office will submit the completed and checked application to UKRI.

Where indicated, you can also demonstrate elements of your responses in visual form if relevant. You should:

  • use images sparingly and only to convey important information that cannot easily be put into words
  • insert each new image onto a new line
  • provide a descriptive legend for each image immediately underneath it (this counts towards your word limit)
  • Ensure files are smaller than 8MB and in JPEG, JPG, JPE, JFI, JIF, JFIF, PNG, GIF, BMP or WEBP format

Watch our research office webinars about the new Funding Service.

For more guidance on the Funding Service, see:

Deadline

ESRC must receive your application by 11 January 2023 4:00pm UK time.

You will not be able to apply after this time.

Make sure you are aware of and follow any internal institutional deadlines.

Following the submission of your application to the funding opportunity your application cannot be changed and applications will not be returned for amendment. If your application does not follow the guidance, it may be rejected.

Personal data

Processing personal data

ESRC, as part of UKRI, will need to collect some personal information to manage your Funding Service account and the registration of your funding applications.

We will handle personal data in line with UK data protection legislation and manage it securely. For more information, including how to exercise your rights, read our privacy notice.

ESRC, as part of UKRI, will need to share the application and any personal information that it contains with Home Office so that they can participate in the assessment process.

The personal data supplied to the Home Office will be managed confidentially, securely and in accordance with the Data Protection Act 2018.

Read details relating to the Home Office Recruitment Privacy Information Notice. The personal data provided in connection with your application will not be retained by the Home Office beyond 24 months should your application be unsuccessful. If you are appointed to a post your personal data will only be used by the Home Office for the purposes of Personnel Management.

Publication of outcomes

ESRC, as part of UKRI, will publish the outcomes of this funding opportunity at What ESRC has funded.

If your application is successful, we will publish some personal information on the UKRI Gateway to Research.

Summary

Word limit: 5

ESRC will work with the successful applicant to produce a summary which will be made publicly available.

Core team

List the key members of your team and assign them roles from the following:

  • project lead (PL)

Only list one individual as project lead.

Find out more about UKRI’s core team roles in funding applications.

Application questions

Applicant capability to deliver

Word limit: 3,000

Why are you the right individual successfully deliver the proposed work?

What the assessors are looking for in your response

Evidence of how you have:

  • the right balance of skills and expertise to cover the proposed activities
  • the appropriate leadership and management skills to deliver the work
  • contributed to developing a positive research environment and wider community
  • the ability to identify and overcome challenges associated with the use and linking of administrative data, and with providing safe access to administrative data for research purposes
  • the ability to communicate clearly, translate complex information and advise and influence research users, practitioners and policymakers

The word count for this section is 3,000 words; 2,500 words to be used for R4RI modules and, if necessary, a further 500 words for Additions.

Use the Résumé for Research and Innovation (R4RI) format to showcase the range of relevant skills you have and how this will help deliver the proposed work. You can include your specific achievements but only choose past contributions that best evidence your ability to deliver this work.

Complete this section using the R4RI module headings listed. Use each heading once and include a response for the whole team, see the UKRI guidance on R4RI. You should consider how to balance your answer, and emphasise where appropriate the key skills you bring:

  • contributions to the generation of new ideas, tools, methodologies, or knowledge
  • the development of others and maintenance of effective working relationships
  • contributions to the wider research and innovation community
  • contributions to broader research or innovation users and audiences and towards wider societal benefit
Additions

Provide any further details relevant to your application. This section is optional and can be up to 500 words. You should not use it to describe additional skills, experiences, or outputs, but you can use it to describe any factors that provide context for the rest of your R4RI (for example, details of career breaks if you wish to disclose them).

Complete this as a narrative. Do not format it like a CV.

UKRI has introduced new role types for funding opportunities being run on the new Funding Service.

For full details, see Eligibility as an individual.

You may demonstrate elements of your responses in visual form if relevant. Further details are provided in the service.

Ethics and responsible research and innovation (RRI)

Word limit: 500

What are the ethical or RRI implications and issues relating to the proposed work? If you do not think that the proposed work raises any ethical or RRI issues, explain why.

What the assessors are looking for in your response

Demonstrate that you have identified and evaluated:

  • the relevant ethical or responsible research and innovation considerations
  • how you will manage these considerations

All proposals have to comply with the ESRC Framework for Research Ethics which includes guidance for applicants and links to related web resources.

All necessary ethical approvals must be in place before the project commences, but do not need to have been secured at the time of application.

If you are generating data as part of your project, you should complete the ‘Data Management’ question and should cover ethical considerations relating to data in your response.

You may demonstrate elements of your responses in visual form if relevant. Further details are provided in the service.

Resources and cost justification

Word limit: 1,000

What will you need to deliver your proposed work and how much will it cost?

What the assessors are looking for in your response

Justify the application’s more costly resources, in particular:

  • a travel and subsistence budget should be included to attend Home Office premises in central London no more than twice a month. Travel and subsistence costs of up to £15,000 can be included to achieve this
  • any consumables beyond typical requirements, or that are required in exceptional quantities
  • all resources that have been costed as ‘Exceptions’

Assessors are not looking for detailed costs or a line-by-line breakdown of all project resources. Overall, they want you to demonstrate how the resources you anticipate needing for your proposed work:

  • are comprehensive, appropriate, and justified
  • represent the optimal use of resources to achieve the intended outcomes
  • maximise potential outcomes and impacts

Due to the nature of this opportunity, we are not expecting to see costs included for:

  • data collection
  • primary research
  • project co-leads
  • research assistants or roles to support the project lead
  • non-UK project leads or co-leads
  • equipment, facilities or infrastructure to support research

For detailed guidance on eligible costs please see the ESRC research funding guide.

Primary discipline classification

Word limit: 5

Enter the primary discipline for this project

What the assessors are looking for in your response

Select one primary area of research from the list of social disciplines below and enter into the text field:

  • area studies
  • demography
  • development studies
  • economics
  • education
  • environmental planning
  • history
  • human geography
  • law and legal studies
  • linguistics
  • management and business studies
  • political science and international studies
  • psychology
  • science and technology studies
  • social anthropology
  • social policy
  • social work
  • sociology
  • tools, technologies and methods

This information is used to determine eligibility for ESRC funding and to assist in the selection of appropriate reviewers.

Your organisation’s support

Word limit: 10

Provide details of support from your research organisation.

What the assessors are looking for in your response

Assessors will be looking for a strong statement of commitment from your research organisation which confirms that the applicant will dedicate a specific time amount within the permitted range (0.4 – 0.6) FTE to the award for its duration.

We recognise that in some instances, this information may be provided by the Research Office, the Technology Transfer Office (TTO) or equivalent, or a combination of both.

You must also include the following details:

  • a significant person’s name and their position, from the TTO or Research Office, or both
  • office address or web link

Upload details are provided within the service on the actual application.

Data management

Word limit: 500

How will you manage and share data generated through the proposed work?

What the assessors are looking for in your response

Most NCJL data can only be accessed with security clearance and through secure environments. The grant holder will only access NCJL data for the purposes of the academic lead role and will only use it to progress the work of the NCJL programme. As such, the grant holder will not own the data, analysis of the data or intellectual property rights produced during the course of the award. This should be reflected in the data management plan.

Demonstrate that you have designed your proposed work so that you can:

Within the ‘Data management’ section we also expect you to:

  • plan for the research through the life cycle of the award until data is accepted for archiving by the UK Data Service (UKDS) or a responsible data repository
  • demonstrate compliance with ESRC’s research data policy and ESRC framework for research ethics. This should include confirmation that existing datasets have been reviewed and why currently available datasets are inadequate for the proposed research
  • cover any legal and ethical considerations of collecting, releasing or storing the data, including consent, confidentiality, anonymisation, security and other ethical issues
  • include any challenges to data sharing (for example, copyright or data confidentiality), with possible solutions discussed to optimise data sharing

If this does not apply to your proposed work, you will be able to indicate this in the Funding Service.

References

Word limit: 1,000

List the references you have used to support your application.

What the assessors are looking for in your response

Include all references in this section, not in the rest of the application questions.

You should not include any other information in this section.

We advise you not to include hyperlinks, as assessors are not obliged to access the information they lead to or consider it in their assessment of your application.

If linking to web resources, to maintain the information’s integrity, include persistent identifiers (such as digital object identifiers) where possible.

You must not include links to web resources to extend your application.

How we will assess your application

Assessment process

We will assess your application using the following process.

Panel

We will invite experts and representatives from ESRC and Home Office to collectively review your application against the criteria and rank it alongside other applications. The panel will shortlist some applications for interview.

Interview

An expert interview panel will conduct interviews with shortlisted applicants after which the interview panel will make a funding recommendation.

We expect interviews to be held in early February 2024.

Home Office and ESRC will make the final funding decision. Home Office and ESRC reserve the right to modify the assessment process after the opportunity has closed.

Find out more about ESRC’s assessment process.

Timescale

We aim to complete the assessment process in early February 2024.

Feedback

If your application was discussed by the panel, we will provide feedback with the outcome of your application.

Principles of assessment

We support the San Francisco declaration on research assessment (DORA) and recognise the relationship between research assessment and research integrity.

Find out about the UKRI Principles of Assessment and Decision Making.

Sharing data with co-funders

We will need to share the application (including any personal information that it contains) with the Home Office so that they can participate in the assessment process.

The personal data supplied to the Home Office will be managed confidentially, securely and in accordance with the Data Protection Act 2018. Read further details relating to the Home Office Recruitment Privacy Information Notice. The personal data provided in connection with your application will not be retained beyond 24 months should your application be unsuccessful. If you are appointed to a post your personal data will only be used for the purposes of personnel management.

Assessment criteria

The assessment areas we will use are:

  • applicant’s capability to deliver
  • ethics and responsible research and innovation (RRI)
  • resources and cost justification
  • your organisation’s support
  • data management (if applicable)

Find details of assessment questions and criteria under the ‘Application questions’ heading in the ‘How to apply’ section.

Contact details

Get help with your application

If you have a question and the answers aren’t provided on this page

Important note: The Helpdesk is committed to helping users of the UKRI Funding Service as effectively and as quickly as possible. In order to manage cases at peak volume times, the Helpdesk will triage and prioritise those queries with an imminent opportunity deadline or a technical issue. Enquiries raised where information is available on the Funding Finder opportunity page and should be understood early in the application process (for example, regarding eligibility or content/remit of an opportunity) will not constitute a priority case and will be addressed as soon as possible.

Contact details

For help and advice on costings and writing your proposal please contact your research office in the first instance, allowing sufficient time for your organisation’s submission process.

For questions related to this specific funding opportunity please contact sgsgrants@esrc.ukri.org

Any queries regarding the system or the submission of applications through the Funding Service should be directed to the helpdesk.

Email: support@funding-service.ukri.org
Phone: 01793 547490

Our phone lines are open:

  • Monday to Thursday 8:30am to 5:00pm
  • Friday 8:30am to 4:30pm

To help us process queries quicker, we request that users highlight the council and opportunity name in the subject title of their email query, include the application reference number, and refrain from contacting more than one mailbox at a time.

Find out more information on submitting an application.

Sensitive information

If you or a core team member need to tell us something you wish to remain confidential, please contact sgsgrants@esrc.ukri.org

Include in the subject line: [the funding opportunity title; sensitive information; your Funding Service application number].

Typical examples of confidential information include:

  • individual is unavailable until a certain date (for example due to parental leave)
  • declaration of interest
  • additional information about eligibility to apply that would not be appropriately shared in the ‘Applicant capability ’ section
  • conflict of interest for UKRI to consider in reviewer or panel participant selection
  • the application is an invited resubmission

For information about how UKRI handles personal data, read UKRI’s privacy notice.

Additional info

Research disruption due to COVID-19

We recognise that the COVID-19 pandemic has caused major interruptions and disruptions across our communities. We are committed to ensuring that individual applicants and their wider team, including partners and networks, are not penalised for any disruption to their career, such as:

  • breaks and delays
  • disruptive working patterns and conditions
  • the loss of ongoing work
  • role changes that may have been caused by the pandemic

Reviewers and panel members will be advised to consider the unequal impacts that COVID-19 related disruption might have had on the capability to deliver and career development of those individuals included in the application. They will be asked to consider the capability of the applicant and their wider team to deliver the research they are proposing.

Where disruptions have occurred, you can highlight this within your application if you wish, but there is no requirement to detail the specific circumstances that caused the disruption.

Intellectual property rights and publication

The term intellectual property rights’ when used here means patents, inventions, trademarks, service marks, logos, design rights (whether registerable or otherwise), applications for any of the foregoing, copyright, database rights, domain names, trade or business names, moral rights and other similar rights or obligations whether registerable or not in any country (including but not limited to the UK) and the right to sue for passing off.

The grant holder, subject to completing security clearance, will work with sensitive data controlled by the Home Office and its partners. The grant holder will only access this data for the purposes of the academic lead role and will only use it to progress the work of the NCJL programme. As such, the grant holder will not own the data, analysis of the data or intellectual property rights produced during the course of the award. The exception to this is methodological developments made by the academic lead that can be described and used without the Home Office data, which the grant holder would retain.

All intellectual property rights generated through the work, deliverables and results during the term of the award which arise from or are connected with the grant holder’s work with the Home Office (referred to here as ‘Home Office outputs’), shall automatically, on creation, vest in the Crown absolutely, whenever they arise. To the extent that they do not vest automatically, the grant holder and the research organisation (RO) will hold them on trust for the Crown. The grant holder and the RO will promptly execute all documents and do all acts as may, in the opinion of the Home Office, be necessary to give effect to this.

The grant holder and the RO will irrevocably waive all moral rights under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (and all similar rights in other jurisdictions) which either of them has or will have in any existing or future works which are Home Office outcomes in relation to which intellectual property rights subsist. If the grant holder during the award makes or creates any deliverables which result in Home Office outcomes protected by intellectual property rights, the grant holder and RO will assign or procure the assignment to the Home Office of all intellectual property rights in such deliverables and results.

Any works made by the grant holder in the course or arising out of the award (including any made after the award is completed) which are not Home Office outputs, such as (but without limitation) books, articles, blogs based on information obtained during and as a result of undertaking the award, will be referred to as ‘non-Home Office outputs’, and the intellectual property rights will be owned by the grant holder or the RO as appropriate. The grant holder will agree with the Home Office when the award commences a process for publishing, presenting or both, non-Home Office outputs. The grant holder will not publish Home Office outputs, unless they have been made available under the Open Government Licence in which case the material concerned may be used in accordance with that licence.

There may also be joint award outputs where intellectual property rights are shared by the grant holder and the Home Office. In this instance there will be a non-exclusive, indefinite, fully paid-up, royalty free licence agreement between the grant holder and the Home Office to use the joint outputs in any way, for any purpose and in any medium throughout the world (subject to the conditions on confidentiality and publication agreed when the award commences).

In addition to meeting UKRI grant holder reporting requirements, the grant holder will report to the Home Office any key impacts resulting directly or indirectly from the award up to seven years after the conclusion of the award.

Additional links

Equality Impact Assessment (PDF, 249KB)

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